What Students Walking Out Over Covid Can Learn From Student Movements

Fed up with mandatory in-person school attendance policies that fail to keep them safe, students are marching out of classrooms and into the streets.

Last week, hundreds of students from over 30 public high schools in New York City walked out of class to protest the unsafe conditions in city schools. Despite the latest Covid-19 wave, during which over 38,000 students and teachers tested positive COVID, school officials have insisted on in-person classes. That same week, students from a group called the Chicago Public Schools Radical Youth Alliance (Chi-Rads), formed days prior, led a walkout followed by a protest at Chicago Public Schools headquarters. Their demands included masks, tests, laptops for remote learning, and a voice at the negotiating table for COVID safety plans.

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Movements Remember Victories That Helped The People Of Brazil

The year 2021 was full of bad news for Brazilians. The effects of the global pandemic were made much worse due to the gross negligence of the federal government of Jair Bolsonaro leaving no sector untouched. The country reached the sad milestone of 600,000 deaths by coronavirus, the Bolsonaro administration’s avaricious quest for natural resource wealth coupled with the expansion of agribusiness made the country’s forests, green areas, and Indigenous and traditional communities victims of this violent offensive.

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Court Ruling Threatens Eviction Of Landless Workers Movement Camp

Valinhos, Brazil – The camp was created on April 14, 2018 and named after Rio de Janeiro socialist city councilwoman Marielle Franco who was murdered a month before. Since then, the residents have transformed the abandoned land into a thriving community that provides housing for the residents, a school, a community kitchen, and produces agroecological products and handicrafts. They now face eviction after a court ruling that clearly favors real estate speculation and generating profit for its investors over the social and legal right to housing and agrarian reform.

On 23 November, the São Paulo Court of Justice authorized the eviction of 450 families living in the Landless Rural Workers Movement’s (MST) Marielle Vive camp in Valinhos.

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Thousands Of Brazilians Shout ‘Bolsonaro Never Again!’

On Saturday, thousands of Brazilians took to the streets to demand the removal of President Jair Bolsonaro, who is being investigated by the Supreme Court for crimes related to the dissemination of fake news about COVID-19 and vaccines. This happened in a country that has counted over 615,000 deaths since the pandemic began.

The mobilizations against the far-righ President were summoned by organizations such as the Brazilian Women Articulation (AMB), the Women’s World March (MMM), the Unified Black Movement (MNO), the Landless Rural Workers Movement (MST), the Union of Blacks for Equality (UNEGRO), the Workers’ Party (PT), the Socialism and Freedom Party (PSOL), the Communist Party of Brazil (PCdoB), the Central Unitary of Workers (CUT), and the Central of Workers of Brazil (CTB).

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Brazil Turns On Bolsonaro

Three years after the election of President Jair Bolsonaro, Brazil has been transformed from a generally respected rising power into a pariah state, repudiated for its appalling environmental and human rights record and for what Doctors Without Borders has called the world’s worst response to COVID-19. Brazilians like to joke about foreigners only knowing the country as the land of soccer, samba, and carnival. Today it is known as a prominent hub of far-right transnational conspiracy theories and democratic erosion. Bolsonaro, who ascended to the presidency of Latin America’s largest nation on a wave of reactionary bloodlust, willful ignorance, and the wishful thinking of establishment actors convinced they could control him, looms in international coverage of Brazil as a clear and present danger.

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Brazil: GM Workers Reject Contract, Continue Strike In Defiance Of Union

The readiness of workers to continue their struggle for jobs and decent wages is an expression of the growing resistance of the working class in Brazil and worldwide to the assault on their living conditions and the ruling class’s demand for a new “normal” of mass COVID-19 infections. Recently, strikes in defense of living conditions were also conducted by Jurong shipyard workers in Espírito Santo, metalworkers in Paraná, app delivery workers throughout Brazil, and yesterday by teachers and municipal employees in São Paulo.

Since the beginning of the year, the living conditions of the working class have seriously deteriorated in Brazil. Studies have shown that as early as December 2020, more than half of the Brazilian population was living under food insecurity, a situation that has worsened in the face of food and fuel price hikes and a cumulative inflation rate of 10.25 percent over the past 12 months.

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Indigenous People Of Brazil Fight For Their Future

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro has given new license to the killing of Indigenous people in Brazil. Before he came to power in 2019, it wasn’t clear what he wanted to build, but he knew exactly who and what he wanted to destroy: the Indigenous people and the Amazon rainforest, respectively.

“Bolsonaro attacked a woman first, the land, our mother,” the Indigenous leader Célia Xakriabá told me. “We have no choice but to fight back.”

Since becoming president, the former Army captain, who served under the country’s last military dictator, has led an unprecedented war against the environment and the people protecting it. A slew of anti-Indigenous legislation, escalated violence against and assassinations of Indigenous land defenders, and the COVID-19 pandemic have threatened the existence of Brazil’s original people, the Amazon rainforest, and the future of the planet.

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Indigenous People Of Brazil Fight For Their Future

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro has given new license to the killing of Indigenous people in Brazil. Before he came to power in 2019, it wasn’t clear what he wanted to build, but he knew exactly who and what he wanted to destroy: the Indigenous people and the Amazon rainforest, respectively.

“Bolsonaro attacked a woman first, the land, our mother,” the Indigenous leader Célia Xakriabá told me. “We have no choice but to fight back.”

Since becoming president, the former Army captain, who served under the country’s last military dictator, has led an unprecedented war against the environment and the people protecting it. A slew of anti-Indigenous legislation, escalated violence against and assassinations of Indigenous land defenders, and the COVID-19 pandemic have threatened the existence of Brazil’s original people, the Amazon rainforest, and the future of the planet.

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Paulo Freire At 100

Today marks the centennial anniversary of the birth of Brazilian philosopher Paulo Freire. Most widely known for his magisterial Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Freire’s work continues to be a lodestar for teachers working in poverty-stricken communities across the globe, and for just about anyone who’s searching for a sense of justice in an unjust world.

Every critically-minded educator has at some point used Freire in their teaching ––either to gain some insight into the upside-down world of the oppressed, or as the inspiration that led them to view teaching as a way to overturn society’s asymmetries of power and privilege. Freire’s literacy programmes for empowering peasants are now used in countries all over the globe, and Pedagogy of the Oppressed is currently the third most cited work in the social sciences, and first in the field of education.

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‘Coup Pusher’ Bolsonaro Increasingly Isolated In Brazil

The far-right leader did not achieve the tide in his favor that he himself expected to gather to commemorate Independence Day. However, the center of Brasilia, and especially Sao Paulo (125,000 demonstrators), were filled with fervent followers dressed in green and yellow, the national colors.

“Despite his isolation, the president has shown that he is still capable of mobilizing a noisy minority,” wrote journalist Bernardo Mello Franco in the daily O Globo.

The marches saw a heterogeneous mix of far-right activists, pro-gun supporters, evangelicals, bikers, conspiracy and anti-vaccine activists.

The fact that the protesters were non-violent and did not invade the Supreme Court or Congress as feared, in a Brazilian version of the January assault on the Capitol in Washington, came as a relief.

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September 7th: The Greatest Crime

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro  just appropriated Brazil’s September 7, Independence Day holiday for his own political purposes.

If he had appropriated Rio’s Cristo Redentor statue or Petrobras state petroleum company, the crime would have been less egregious.

September 7th is supposed to be a great civic festival that includes all Brazilians, regardless of party colors or ideological preferences. But this year, it will will be an exclusive manifestation of the bolsonaristas in support of their “Myth” and, even worse, in defiance of or even attacking democratic institutions.

There are a lot of warnings about avoiding the riots, but the big riot has already happened without a single person taking to the streets. By appropriating Independence Day, Bolsonaro just broke the Constitution, the law, tradition and the rules of pluralist democracy.

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How Amilcar Cabral Shaped Paulo Freire’s Pedagogy

Amílcar L Cabral was born 12 September 1924 in Bafatá, Guinea-Bissau, one of Portugal’s African colonies. He was murdered on 20 January 1973 by fascist Portuguese assassins just months before the national liberation movement, in which he played a central role, won the independence of Guinea-Bissau.

Cabral and the other leaders of the movement understood that they were fighting in a larger anticolonial struggle and global class war and, as such, that their immediate enemies were not only the colonial governments of particular countries, but Portuguese colonialism in general. For 500 years, Portuguese colonialism was built upon the slave trade and the systematic pillaging of its African colonies: Mozambique, Guinea Bissau, São Tomé e Príncipe, Angola and Cape Verde.

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Indigenous Peoples Set Up Protest Camp In Brasilia

From August 22 to 28, the Articulation of Indigenous Peoples of Brazil (APIB) and its regional organizations will carry out a national mobilization to defend their ancestral territories.

On Sunday, the Indigenous peoples established a camp in Brasilia where the headquarters of the State functions are located. Throughout the week, they will carry out demonstrations to reject President Jair Bolsonaro and prevent the Supreme Court of Brazil (STF) from approving the “Time Frame”, which is a norm related to the demarcation of their ancestral lands.

The UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Francisco Cali Tzay asked the Supreme Court to reject a legal proposal promoted by private companies, which are only interested in exploiting the natural resources found within the Indigenous territories.

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Show Children The Green Fields And Let The Sunshine Into Their Minds

Exactly two years ago, I walked with my colleagues from Tricontinental: Institute for Social Research through the Camp Marielle Vive (‘Marielle Lives’) outside of Valinhos in the state of São Paulo, Brazil with a great sense of déjà vu. The camp resembles so many other communities of the desperately poor on our planet. The United Nations calculates that one in eight people on our planet – one billion human beings – live in such precariousness. The homes are made of a jumble of materials: blue tarpaulin sheets and bits of wood, corrugated iron sheets and old bricks. A thousand families live in Camp Marielle Vive, named after the Brazilian socialist Marielle Franco, who was assassinated in March 2018.

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More Protests In Brazil Over COVID Crisis

Protesters have taken to the streets across Brazil once more to demand far-right President Jair Bolsonaro step down over his government’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic as well as recent corruption allegations. Demonstrators marched in Rio de Janeiro and several other cities nationwide on Saturday in the latest display of public anger and frustration to hit the South American nation in recent weeks.

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