Hiroshima-Nagasaki: The Story They Want Us To Forget

The world’s first nuclear explosion occurred on July 16, 1945, when a plutonium implosion device was tested at a site located 210 miles south of Los Alamos, New Mexico, on the barren plains of the Alamogordo Bombing Range, known as the Jornada del Muerto (day of the dead).

US President Harry Truman ordered the first atomic bomb to be dropped on Hiroshima, Japan on August 6, 1945. Days later (August 9) Washington dropped a second bomb on Nagasaki.

Official figures of those killed by the atomic bombs is well over 150,000 from the two cities. More than 100,000 were injured with most likely dying. Then over the years many thousands have died from the initial radiation poisoning.

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Atomic Bomb Survivors Transformed Our Understanding Of Radiation’s Impacts

Hiroshima, Japan – Kunihiko Iida wants the world to know that the atomic bombs the United States dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki 75 years ago next month are still claiming lives and causing suffering.

Iida was 3 years old in August 1945. His father had died in battle; he was living with his mother and her parents in a house 900 meters from Hiroshima’s hypocenter, the spot right beneath the detonation. The blast crumpled the house. The family fled the city, but Iida’s mother and older sister soon died from their injuries, a fact the little boy didn’t grasp.

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Remember All Victims Of The Atomic Bombing In Hiroshima

Every person on this planet should know about the American atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki on August 6th and 9th, 1945 which supposedlyended the second world war (The Soviets never get any credit from the West for their vital contribution in WW2). Being that this bombing occurred in Japan, most people tend to think it was only Japanese victims. Yes, the majority of the victims were Japanese, innocent civilians at that, but we must remember the Korean workers who were forced to go to Japan through colonialism and were ultimately obliterated by American militarism. Japan colonized Korea from 1905-1945, forcing Korean laborers to work in Japan as well as other colonies of the imperial nation. Korean workers were either physically forced to leave their homeland or voluntarily moved to Japan due to lack of opportunity in colonized Korea.

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72nd Anniversary Of Hiroshima’s Gratuitous Mass Murder

By Stephen Lendman for Paul Craig Roberts – War in the Pacific was won months before Franklin Roosevelt’s April 12, 1945 death. He declined to accept the Japanese offer of surrender. So did Harry Truman when he became president. War continued for months unnecessarily, countless more casualties inflicted, mainly Japanese civilians – notably from fire-bombing Toyko in March 1945, an estimated 100,000 perishing in the firestorm, many more injured, over a million left homeless. Around the same time, five dozen other Japanese cities were fire-bombed. Most structures in the country were wooden and easily consumed. The attacks amounting to war crimes achieved no strategic advantage. In early 1945, Japan offered to surrender. In February, Douglas McArthur sent Roosevelt a 40-page summary of its terms. They were nearly unconditional. The Japanese would accept an occupation, would cease hostilities, surrender its arms, remove all troops from occupied territories, submit to criminal war trials, and allow its industries to be regulated. In return, they asked only that their emperor be retained in an honorable capacity. Roosevelt spurned the offer as did Truman. Hiroshima and Nagasaki followed on August 6 and 9 respectively.

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Obama’s Hiroshima Visit: Reminder Atomic Bombs Weren’t What Won War

By Gar Alperovitz for The Huffington Post – U.S. President Barack Obama’s forthcoming visit to Hiroshima offers an opportunity to reconsider some of the myths surrounding the historic decision to use the atomic bomb. Such reconsideration also helps focus attention on how we can avoid any future use of weapons that are now thousands of times more powerful than the ones used in 1945. A good place to start is with an unusual and little-noticed display at The National Museum of the United States Navy in Washington.

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